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Avinash Wadhawan: I say yes to a project only after intensely looking at my role

 
Mumbai, Nov 22 (IANS) Last seen in 'Piyaa Albela', actor Avinash Wadhawan is going to be part of the ongoing show 'Agar Tum Na Hote'.

He plays the role of 'Gajendra Panday' or 'Gajju' in the show. The actor shares that he fell in love with his character when he got the first narration.

"I could deeply connect with the story which I think is very gripping with all its shocking twists. My role is that of a very influential, rich and suave power broker based in Uttar Pradesh. I'm also the father of the male lead of the show, Abhimanyu (played by Himanshu Soni). It's a well-defined role and has an important and meaty part to play in the story."

"My character is almost like one of the main protagonists. The story is full of drama, emotions and shows a strained but deeply bonded relationship between a father and his son. The father has extreme love for his son, but due to some reasons, there's a lot of friction between them which troubles the father a lot. He is very strong and ruthless to the outside world, but at the same time, is very loving, caring, passionate, and concerned about his family. There are different layers to my character," he says.

Before taking up a role, there are 2-3 things that Avinash keeps in mind. "First is what my character is all about, how it is going to gel with the story and last but not the least, the production house. I wouldn't take up a role if it doesn't have the scope to leave a mark on the audience. Well location of shoot and money offered is also a deciding factor," he adds.

According to him the title of the show is catchy. "I remember listening to the song 'Agar Tum Na Hote' a lot during my school days. So, when I got to know the title of the show, I was very much attracted to it. It is definitely a very nice, emotional and sensitive title that conveys a lot by itself," says the actor.

There is an opinion that the content on TV has evolved. "There have been many big changes as technology evolves every decade. I started doing TV 10-12 years ago and at that time things were different not only technology-wise but also the story content."

"Saas-bahu sagas have taken a back seat. Writers, Directors and editors of today are more diverse, quicker and technically advanced. Story moves forward with a greater pace even the audience of today is bored of yesteryear's replicated storylines and is now accepting and grabbing new and different content. Technically, unlike today, earlier actors could not record and dub through mobiles. TVs too give a theatrical experience with sharp pixels and huge sizes," says Avinash.

--IANS
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